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Exploring the Distinctions: Two-Vessel vs Three-Vessel Brewhouse

Exploring the Distinctions: Two-Vessel vs Three-Vessel Brewhouse

The brewhouse is the heart of any brewery, where the brewing process begins, and the magic of beer making happens. It’s the place where malt is mashed, wort is boiled, and hops are added. The brewhouse consists of several vessels, each with a specific purpose. Two of the most common types of brewhouses are the two-vessel and three-vessel brewhouses. In this article, we will explore the differences between these two types and help you decide which one is right for your brewery.

Two-Vessel Brewhouse

A two-vessel brewhouse is the simplest type, consisting of a mash/lauter tun and a kettle/whirlpool. Let’s take a closer look at each vessel.

Mash/Lauter Tun: The mash/lauter tun is where the malt is mixed with hot water to create a mash, which is then circulated through a perforated false bottom to separate the spent grains from the wort. The wort is then transferred to the kettle/whirlpool for boiling. In a two-vessel brewhouse, the mash/lauter tun can also be used as a lauter tun to separate the wort from the spent grains.

Kettle/Whirlpool: The kettle/whirlpool is where the wort is boiled, and hops are added to impart bitterness, flavor, and aroma to the beer. After boiling, the wort is transferred to the whirlpool, where it is spun to separate the hot break from the wort before cooling and transferring to the fermenter.

Pros and Cons: The main advantage of a two-vessel brewhouse is its simplicity and cost-effectiveness. It requires less space and fewer vessels, resulting in lower capital and operating costs. However, it may not provide enough flexibility and control for larger breweries that require more advanced brewing processes.

Three-Vessel Brewhouse

A three-vessel brewhouse is a more complex and versatile system, consisting of a mash tun, a lauter tun, and a kettle/whirlpool. Let’s take a closer look at each vessel.

Mash Tun: The mash tun in a three-vessel brewhouse is where the malt is mixed with hot water to create a mash. Unlike a two-vessel brewhouse, the mash tun is dedicated solely to mashing and does not double as a lauter tun.

Lauter Tun: The lauter tun is where the wort is separated from the spent grains. It is equipped with a false bottom that allows the wort to drain into the kettle while leaving the spent grains behind.

Kettle/Whirlpool: The kettle/whirlpool in a three-vessel brewhouse is similar to that in a two-vessel system. It is where the wort is boiled, and hops are added, while the whirlpool separates the hot break from the wort.

Pros and Cons: The main advantage of a three-vessel brewhouse is its flexibility and control over the brewing process. With separate vessels for mashing and lautering, brewers can fine-tune the process for better efficiency, consistency, and quality. However, it requires more space, more vessels, and additional cleaning and maintenance efforts, resulting in higher capital and operating costs.

Choosing the Right Brewhouse for Your Brewery

Choosing the right brewhouse depends on factors such as the size of your brewery, the type of beer you want to brew, and your budget. Here are some considerations when choosing between a two-vessel and three-vessel brewhouse:

Size: A two-vessel brewhouse is suitable for small to medium-sized breweries producing up to 10,000 barrels per year. A three-vessel brewhouse is better suited for larger breweries producing more than 10,000 barrels per year.

Flexibility: A three-vessel brewhouse offers more flexibility and control, ideal for brewers experimenting with different recipes and techniques. A two-vessel brewhouse, though more limited, can still produce a wide variety of beer styles.

Efficiency: A three-vessel brewhouse can be more efficient, resulting in higher yields and better beer quality. However, this depends on the brewer’s skill and experience.

Cost: A two-vessel brewhouse is generally less expensive in terms of capital and operating costs. However, a three-vessel brewhouse can provide better long-term returns, especially for larger breweries.

Conclusion

The choice between a two-vessel and three-vessel brewhouse depends on the size of your brewery, the type of beer you want to brew, and your budget. A two-vessel brewhouse offers simplicity and cost-effectiveness, while a three-vessel brewhouse provides flexibility and control. Ultimately, choose the brewhouse that best meets your needs and goals as a brewer.

If you are planning to open or expand your brewery and need a turnkey solution for brewery equipment, you can contact us directly. Our engineers will design and manufacture brewery equipment tailored to your brewing process. We also provide complete turnkey solutions and customized options for expanding breweries.

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